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Monday, March 2, 2015

Crochet Leather Bracelet

This post was originally created by me for Darice. It also contains affiliate links for your convenience.


I don't do a lot of jewelry projects and tutorials, so this post is a bit outside of my wheelhouse, but I'm always looking for new materials to crochet, and when I saw this thin leather cording, I knew it would make some great crocheted jewelry. The tassels are trending right now, and they make this bracelet a lot of fun to wear. 

Want to make your own? Here's what you will need:


Materials:
Step One - Begin by attaching your cord to one side of the clasp using a single crochet stitch. I love this clasp because you can crochet the leather cord right onto it! Using the smaller 2.75 mm hook (the other one is too big to fit through the holes in the clasp), crochet one singe crochet stitch over each hole.



Begin with a slip knot on your hook and work each stitch over each hole in the clasp as shown in the image above. You should now have four single crochet stitches.

Step Two - Now we are going to switch to the larger 3.5 mm hook to give our stitches a little more room to breathe. With the larger hook, chain 1, turn, and single crochet in each stitch across (that’s four total).




Now we are going to switch over to double crochet, so for the next row, chain 2 (that will count as the first dc in this row), and double crochet in each stitch across.



You will repeat this double crochet row thirteen times until your bracelet is about six inches long (if you want a longer bracelet, add a couple more rows).

About halfway through your crochet bracelet, your first strand of leather cording will run out. To add in the new piece, complete half of the last double crochet in your row, and then pull through the final two loops with the new piece.

When you are finished with your bracelet, go back and use the smaller hook to weave in the ends along the back of the crochet bracelet, and then just snip off the tail ends.



After your 14 dc rows, do one row of sc in each stitch. Then it is time to switch back to the smaller 2.75 mm hook and crochet through the other clasp.

Step Three - To crochet your bracelet to the other side of the clasp, first insert your hook into the stitch in the bracelet and draw up a loop, then insert your hook into the hole in the clasp and draw through a loop.

P.S. Like my nails? Get them here!


Pull the loop through the two loops on your hook to complete the single crochet. Pull the end of your cord through the final loop, and weave in the end.

Step Four - When your bracelet is all crocheted, it’s time to attach the tassels.



Use your pliers to gently open up a jump rings. Loop the jump ring through the light pink tassel and one of the bottom holes of one of the clasps. Use the pliers to close the jump ring. I attached the darker tassel to the crochet bracelet using three jump rings so it would hang lower than the light pink tassel.

Ta-Da! Your fancy new tassel bracelet is all ready to wear!



If you like this project, be sure to pin the image below so you can find it again!



Friday, February 27, 2015

Crochet X Pillow Pattern

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience.





I am super excited about the crochet pattern I'm sharing today. Super. Excited. I really hope you all like it too. But first, I am also excited to be partnering with some other talented bloggers as part of Project Crochet.



You can join in the fun by posting your latest crochet adventures on social media with the hashtag #projectcrochet - can't wait to see what you all have been making!

Anyway - back to this great pillow.



My goal in my crochet projects is almost always to make something modern - something somewhat sophisticated - something that I would want to buy if I saw it in a store. This pillow is checking all of those boxes for me.

When I showed it to my husband, he said it looked expensive, which was pretty much the best thing he could have said. Yay! Totally made my day.

If you like it too and want to make your own, here's everything you need:

Materials
  • Worsted Weight Cotton Yarn in two colors - Cotton gives this pillow nice structure and stitch definition. You could try acrylic, but I think it will lose some of the structure. I used Lily's Sugar and Cream in Ecru (3 balls) and Black (1 1/2 balls).
  • Size H (5.00 mm) hook (Susan Bates hooks are my favorites)
  • 18" pillow form (If you use a different size pillow form or if you crochet tighter or more loosely than I do, you may need to adjust your cover to fit your form. See the note in the pattern below for more information on how to do that.)
  • Scissors
  • Yarn Needle

Crochet X Pillow Pattern


You will create four squares to be pieced together into the pillow cover. You will need two of the solid squares and two of the striped squares.

Solid Square Pattern

Round 1: Using Color A (Ecru for me), ch 3 (counts as first dc), work 11 dc in first beginning ch, then sl st to the top of the beginning ch 3 to join. (If you prefer, you could start with a ch 4 loop or magic loop and work 12 dcs into the loop.) (12 dc)




Round 2: ch 3, dc in same st, *dc, dc, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) all in next st (forms corner space), repeat from * twice, dc, dc, 2 dc in same space as beginning ch 3 and dc, ch 2, sl st to beginning ch 3 (24 dc)



Round 3: ch 3, dc in each of next 5 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 6 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (40 dc)



Round 4: ch 3, dc in each of next 7 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 10 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 2 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (56 dc)

Round 5: ch 3,  dc in each of next 9 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 14 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 4 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (72 dc)

Round 6: ch 3,  dc in each of next 11 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 18 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 6 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (88 dc)

Round 7: ch 3,  dc in each of next 13 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 22 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 8 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (104 dc)

Round 8: ch 3,  dc in each of next 15 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 26 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 10 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (120 dc)

Round 9: ch 3,  dc in each of next 17 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 30 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 12 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (136 dc)

Round 10: ch 3,  dc in each of next 19 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 34 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 14 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (152 dc)

Round 11: ch 3,  dc in each of next 21 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 38 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 16 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (168 dc)

Please Note: To fit your cover to the pillow form you are using, fold your square in half diagonally, and measure the diagonal line (I think I remember the term "hypotenuse" from Geometry). This should match up with the side measurement of your pillow. Add or remove a round to get your squares to the right size for your pillow form.

Striped Square Pattern

Round 1: Using Color B (Black for me), ch 3 (counts as first dc), work 11 dc in first beginning ch, then sl st to the top of the beginning ch 3 to join. (If you prefer, you could start with a ch 4 loop or magic loop and work 12 dcs into the loop.) (12 dc)

Round 2: ch 3, dc in same st, *dc, dc, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) all in next st (forms corner space), repeat from * twice, dc, dc, 2 dc in same space as beginning ch 3 and dc, ch 2, sl st to beginning ch 3 (24 dc)

Round 3: ch 3, dc in each of next 5 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 6 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (40 dc)

Round 4: ch 3, dc in each of next 7 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 10 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 2 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (56 dc). Finish off Color B, Weave in ends.

Round 5: This round is worked in the back loops only to give a nice clean line (see the image below). Join Color A (Ecru) in ch 3 of previous round. Ch 3,  dc in each of next 9 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 14 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 4 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (72 dc)



Round 6: ch 3,  dc in each of next 11 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 18 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 6 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (88 dc)

Round 7: ch 3,  dc in each of next 13 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 22 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 8 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (104 dc)

Round 8: ch 3,  dc in each of next 15 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 26 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 10 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (120 dc)

Round 9: ch 3,  dc in each of next 17 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 30 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 12 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (136 dc). Finish off Color A, Weave in ends.

Round 10: This round is worked in the back loops only (see the image above). Join Color B (Black) in ch 3 of previous round.  Ch 3,  dc in each of next 19 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 34 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 14 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (152 dc)

Round 11: ch 3,  dc in each of next 21 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, *dc in each of next 38 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in corner space, repeat from * twice, dc in next 16 sts, sl st to beginning ch 3 to join (168 dc)

Please Note: To fit your cover to the pillow form you are using, fold your square in half diagonally, and measure the diagonal line (I think I remember the term "hypotenuse" from Geometry). This should match up with the side measurement of your pillow. Add or remove a round to get your squares to the right size for your pillow form.

When you have two of each type of square, you are all ready to sew your pillow cover together. Grab a long piece of Ecru yarn (or whatever your main color is) and a yarn needle and we will sew it all together!


Start by taking a solid square and a striped square and put them right sides together. You will sew two adjacent sides together. Using the needle and yarn, sew the two pieces together only working your stitches through the back loops of each stitch (see the image below). This will make the seams nice and flat, with the stitches only really being visible on the back.



When you flip the two pieces back right side out, you will flip it so the seams go across the middle of the pillow as show below. Then fold the next square in half and line it up with the two you have just sewn together.


Place the two squares you are sewing together right side together and repeat the process of sewing the pieces together. When you get to a corner in the center of the pillow cover, be sure to sew through all three of the squares so you don't get a hole in the middle of the pillow.


With the final square, sew three of the sides to the pillow case, leaving one side open. Stuff in your pillow form, and then finish sewing up the final seam.


And that's it! Enjoy your new pillow!



Here's what it looks like from the side. There's no seam on the side like a traditional pillow case, but the corner spaces still give it a line and definition on the side.



Now, for more crochet inspiration, check out these posts from my fellow bloggers!  



Thursday, February 26, 2015

Disneyland Fashion: Mickey and Minnie

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience.

If you have been around here much, you know that I am a big Disneyland nerd. I've been thinking about what I want to wear the next time we are in the parks, and I fell down the rabbit hole of fun Disney-inspired products. So. Much. Good. Stuff.

I was specifically looking for pieces that are stylish but that would still be comfortable to wear in the parks. I wanted to share my favorite finds with you all, and since I found so many goodies, I'm going to break this up into a few posts. Let's start off with my favorite Mickey and Minnie inspired finds.




Which is your favorite?

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Crocheted Wire Lettering

This project was originally created by me for Darice, and contains affiliate links. Thanks for supporting Persia Lou!



About the beginning of the year I read a Home Decor Trend report that listed all of the trends that would be on their way out in the new year. One of those listed in the "Not" column of this hot or not list was typography and word art.

I just - No. I will not give up my words and letters and pretty typography. I may be the lamest, but I will continue with my lettering and word art (like this, this, and this).

This project was a new word art technique for me. There are lots of wire words and yarn-wrapped wire word projects out there, and this is my spin on it. I decided to crochet around the wire, and I really like the look it created.

Materials:
I started off by sketching out my design. Since I was doing more than one word, I planned out how the words would relate to each other and where they would touch. I needed four pieces of wire (one for each word plus one for the heart). To determine how long each piece of wire should be, I wrote out the word using a piece of yarn and then measured out a piece of wire the same length.



Once I had my pieces of wire cut, it was time to crochet over the wire. I worked a single crochet over the wire as shown in the image below.



I found it was a little easier to bend the wire as I crocheted over it. When you shape your letters, you can bend it back into shape.



Use the round nose pliers bend the ends of your wire so the yarn doesn’t slip off.



To finish off the yarn, I wrapped it around the end, and use a little dot of hot glue to finish it off.

When I had my wires covered in crochet, I shaped the wired crochet letters into my words. I mostly just used my hands to shape the crochet letters, but the pliers can be useful too. I referred back to my sketch constantly as I shaped the letters.



I used a small piece of yarn to secure the spots where the wire crosses and where the words connect to each other. I tied the yarn around the connection, then wrapped the yarn several times over the knot, and secure with a little dot of hot glue.



Once the words were all connected together, it was all ready to hang up! I like that since it’s three-dimensional, it can also be placed on a mantel or shelf.




Tuesday, February 24, 2015

The Makers No. 54



Follow Your Hosts

Corey @ TinySidekick
Alexis @ Persia Lou
Katie @ Upcycled Treasures
Ursula @ Homemade by Carmona
Amy @ Club Narwhal
Anu @ Nalle's House








The talented ladies behind the blog A Joyful Riot are our featured bloggers this week. Machelle and Malissa linked up this adorable animal cookie marquee light at last week's party, and it is basically the cutest thing ever.



Right? Just the cutest. Malissa and Machelle's blog is full of playful crafts and gorgeous DIYs. Here are a few favorites to get you started:


Be sure to follow a Joyful Riot so you don't miss a single happy post!


It was so difficult to narrow down all the amazing projects from last week's party to just a few features! 
There were so many amazing copper pipe projects linked up at last week's party it was tempting to choose all pipe DIYs for this weeks features, but I ended up settling on just one: this really clever Industrial Copper Pipe Clock from Dwelling in Happiness. 


Have you tried the famous Swig sugar cookies? I'm a fan, and now I really need to try Tried and Tasty's Lemon version. Yum!


Kelly of Live, Laugh, Rowe shared her simple and beautiful Abstract Heart Art. I really love the look of this one!


Next up, I'm totally drooling over this Shrimp Scampi Pizza from Cooking with Curls. Looks so good!


And finally, Riva la Diva is sharing a fun beauty tutorial - learn how to create a DIY Faux Hawk up do. 


Thanks so much to everyone who parties with us each week! If you were featured, grab a button!


Persia Lou
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Wanna be featured? Don’t forget to follow your hosts in some way and link back to the party on either your party page or post!
 
>Link up to 3 specific posts on your blog, not your blog’s homepage
(anything you’ve created, but no etsy shops or giveaways)
>Please link only posts that you haven’t shared here before
>Grab The Makers Link Party Button and link back somewhere on your blog
(must link back to be featured)
>Pin the Featured Bloggers winning post
>Visit some other links and let them know you stopped by


Persia Lou
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